5 Questions with Roger Fojas, choreographer for Ada and the Engine

5 Questions with Roger Fojas, choreographer for Ada and the Engine

by | Mar 5, 2019 | Company Blog | 0 comments

5 Questions with Roger Fojas, choreographer for Ada and the Engine


This week, we sat down with Roger Fojas, choreographer for Ada and the Engine and asked him the 5 Questions! Here’s what he had to say:

*So, tell us a little about yourself. What is your artistic background?

Ringmaster Roger with Lucent Dossier

As a performer, choreographer and clown, I’m a founding member of circus troupe Lucent Dossier Experience, as well as company members with Astra Dance Theater, L’Unkles Boink, Silayan Dance Company, Sypher Arts Studio, and the Alien Fight Club. In 2005 I toured as Ringmaster Roger with the band Panic! at the Disco, and I’ve performed and choreographed in circus productions at festivals around the world (Coachella, EDC, LIB, Boom!, Symbiosis, Lollapalooza, Electric Picnic, etc.). I was Dr. Caligari in Astra Dance Theater’s production of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. I’m also known for creating interactive theatrical productions (The Goblin Cabaret as part of the annual Labyrinth Masquerade, Forest Furries Show, The Yellow Suit Society, and The Curious Kukuricoos at the Electric Forest Festival).

*Who are some of your influences?

My influences in movement can vary in range of areas like the world of clowning to contemporary dance as I often enjoy movement and work that that can explore the many levels of emotion and story in the human experience. I work professionally as a clown but I don’t like the thought that I have to create big laughs in order to clown. I can make people just feel as a clown as well. I also don’t think dance has to be about who has the best extensions and turns as I’m not that kind of choreographer or dancer anyways. I tend to be more about the human experience in the art of whatever I’m discovering. And I like how it affects emotion and visual patterns for me. Here are a few that help influence me in that regard: Stefan Haves, Bill Irwin, Slavas Polunin, Sonya Tayeh, Ryan Heffington, DV8 Physical Theatre, Pina Bausch, to name a few.

*So, what is your concept for the movement in Ada and the Engine?

When collaborating with director Heidi Powers I wanted to create specifically with the concept of The Engine in mind and making that the additional texture to the play. When thinking about the various characters and the certain situations and scenes and interactions they have, I’d think about the mechanics of the individual human relationships they’d have to one another and how that might relate to the mechanics of a machine. I’d allow that to inspire any of the stylized movement and dance conceptualized within the show.

*Amazing. And what has the process been like working with the actors thus far?

This particular show has been about discovering, through workshop, the process of what it’s like to be a part of a theoretical machine. Even if we are a human element in that engine, together we can make it work. Conceptualizing how each character fits within it in order for it to work helped us workshop the movement of the actors that went into the work. In any movement and/or dance I put into the show, I decided to incorporate the concept and feel of how an Engine works (or in today’s terms, a computer). For instance, The play itself could be a conceptual engine, the theater, its monitor, the seats, its keyboard, and the actors are its internal parts. When thinking along these lines, we play with the structure and patterns in which the characters would create and then find the textures and movement that could arise from that.

*What is something you’ve learned about Ada or any of the characters during this process that you didn’t know before?

I didn’t know much about Ada Lovelace or Charles Babbage before getting involved in this production so diving into this history has been an incredible wealth of information for me from the very beginning. As for the true historical aspect of all the characters in this play, I’ve gotten to realize that the heart of the life experiences and all its varied raw sensitive triumphs and flaws, beauty and emotions can be a timeless and relatable journey in any decade anywhere in the world and history just by being human.

Get tickets for Ada and the Engine, opening March 21st!

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  1. 🎭 Has It Gotten Easier for Women in STEM? | “Ada and the Engine” @ Theatre Unleashed – Observations Along the Road - […] Costumes were designed by Denise Barrett (FB), and worked well. Movement was choreographed by Roger Fojas (FB). This went…

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